The Dual Labyrinth Type Gossembrot 51 r

In one of his articles, Andreas introduced the relatives of the labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r.

The labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r centered and in concentric shape

The labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r centered and in concentric shape

Today I want to take a closer look at the dual version.
I particularly like this. This is because the outermost circuit (1) lead around all sectors. In the original, the innermost (7) completely circles the center.
And because it can be centered. The entrance takes place on the 3rd ring and the center is reached from the 5th ring. This also creates a small empty space.

I also like the rhythm, it is reminiscent of that of the Chartres labyrinth. It goes quickly to the middle and then follows the long walking in all sectors. Pretty much at the end you come back very close to the entrance, circle the entire labyrinth and then quickly get to the center.

An inverted pentagram is drawn in the middle in Gossembrot’s handwriting. I tried to fully integrate that. The top of the star points down. It is oriented in the direction of the 5 axes. Gossembrot designed the labyrinth around 1480. So this arrangement has no satanic character at all. These ideas only appeared in the middle of the 19th century.

I expressly recommend the excellent article on Wikipedia (see link below) about the geometry and meaning of the pentagram.

The dual and centered labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r in Knidos style

The dual and centered labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r in Knidos style

The five axes also tempt you to choose a pentagonal layout. The same widths for the lines (in black) and the paths (in white) and the angular edges also give it a spatial effect.

The dual labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r centered in pentagonal shape

The dual labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r centered in pentagonal shape

Here is Ariadne’s thread in pentagonal shape:

Ariadne's thread in the dual labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r centered in pentagonal shape

Ariadne’s thread in the dual labyrinth type Gossembrot 51 r centered in pentagonal shape

The effect is spatial, but it seems to go deeper.

Who dares to build such a labyrinth as a walkable labyrinth?
As far as I know there is not a single copy worldwide. It looks new and modern, but its origins go back over 500 years.
The star in the middle, on the other hand, could be left out or only slightly indicated. It is not an element in the type, but is part of the style, similar to the six “petals” in the Chartres labyrinth.
An empty center is always inviting and open to a wide variety of applications.

Further Link

Related Posts

The 3 Circuit Labyrinth on Rubik’s Cube

In the context of the theme Labyrinth and Flower of Life, the similarity to a cube has been mentioned more often. The hexagonal shape of the labyrinth was just too reminiscent of a cube. And that got me looking for the labyrinth on the cube.

I have a magic cube and as a small brain training I solve it once a day. This is now memorized and routinely.

In Further Link below you can find out what a magic cube is.

First, I tried to put Ariadne’s thread on the small squares. This is relatively easy.

For better representation, the 6 sides of a cube are “flattened”:

The layout

The layout

You can draw in there Ariadne’s thread for a 3 circuit labyrinth type Knossos. Generally known, this has the path sequence: 3-2-1-4.
The beginning is on the frontside below at left. Then we go to the third line, to the second and the first line and finally to the center in 4 up in the middle square.

Ariadne's thread

Ariadne’s thread

And here in an isometric view:

Three views

Three views

I hope you can imagine that on the drawings?
We see the lines on 5 sides of the cube, the bottom remains empty. The middle is slightly larger, but we do not touch all the small squares.

Ariadne’s thread for the template with slightly thicker lines:

Ariadne's thread

Ariadne’s thread

If you want, you can download, print or copy the template as a PDF file.

Such a cube would certainly be quite easy to solve as a magic cube. Especially if you have a template of it in mind.

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Further Links

A Golden Greek 50 Euro Commemorative Coin from 2017

In 2017, a commemorative coin dedicated to the Minoan civilization was issued by the Mint of the Central Bank of Greece.
This earliest civilization in Europe can be traced back to the years around 2600 BC. The Minoan civilization got its name from the famous King Minos. The story goes that, with the help of the god of the seas, Poseidon, and a white bull, he came to power and thus gained fame and reverence among his people.

The 50-euro gold coin from 2017 was issued with an edition of 1500 pieces and minted in real gold (999.9 / 1000) in the highest collector quality “polished plate”.

Here is the value side:

Value side: Hellenic Democracy 50 Euro

Value side: Hellenic Democracy 50 Euro

And here the picture side:

Picture side: Minoan Civilization 2017

Picture side: Minoan Civilization 2017

Two nested cross meanders can be seen in a large square around 5 smaller squares.
Here is the structure in a black and white tracing:

Draw up of the picture side

Draw up of the picture side

The black lines form two closed line systems without beginning and end. The white lines have branches and dead-ends, also without access. This is reminiscent of a similar representation on the silver coins of Knossos, which are well over 2000 years older (see related posts below).

Should the representation again symbolize the labyrinth of the Minotaur?

Related Posts

The Labyrinth on the Silver Coins of Knossos, Part 2

In Greek mythology, the labyrinth is the place where the Minotaur is hidden and imprisoned. It is therefore not necessarily a real place.
The labyrinth, as we know it today, is highly inappropriate. Because it has an entrance, a clear path and an accessible center.
Thus, on the silver coins from Knossos we also find very different interpretations of the labyrinth. There are meanders and other symbolic representations.
I want to pick out a motif today and take a closer look at it.

I found two examples with the same motif. One on a coin from the Coin Cabinet of Berlin:

Minotaur 420-380 BC

Minotaur 420-380 BC: Coin Cabinet of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, object 18218282 obverse

Labyrinth 420-380 BC.

Labyrinth 420-380 BC: Coin Cabinet of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, object 18218282 reverse

And one on a coin from the British Museum in London:

Square area meander 500-431 BC

Square area meander 500-431 BC / source: Hermann Kern, Labyrinthe (German edition), 1982, fig. 43

They both represent the same thing. Although the “Berlin” coin seems to be more exact, it contains small errors in two places in the upper area. Two vertical lines collide, where a gap should actually be. This area is more accurately represented on the “London” coin, although the lines there are harder to see.

I made a “final drawing” that shows what the coin maker wanted to show. You can see lines that follow a certain pattern. They are symmetrical, repeating themselves and showing an intricate “path system”. The drawn red thread shows that.
There are four nested paths without beginning and end, but also without entrance. This is not “our” labyrinth but better suited as a prison. The Minotaur would not come out that fast.

The revised area meander

The revised area meander

This could be a hint of the Roman sector labyrinth hundreds of years later.

But it also shows a certain relationship to the Babylonian labyrinth, hundreds of years older and developed in a different culture (see the labyrinthine finger exercises in the post about the Babylonian labyrinth).

Related Posts

Further Link