About Erwin

Fascinated by labyrinths

World Labyrinth Day 2022

Once again (for the 14th time) the Labyrinth Society invites us to celebrate World Labyrinth Day:
World Labyrinth Day is an annual event sponsored by The Labyrinth Society as a worldwide action to “walk as one at 1” local time to create a rolling wave of peaceful energy across the globe. Every year on the first Saturday in May thousands of people around the globe participate in World Labyrinth Day as a moving meditation for world peace and celebration of the labyrinth experience. Many “Walk as One at 1” local time to create a rolling wave of peaceful energy passing from one time zone to the next.

This year, it is in Saturday, May 7, 2022

The call of the Labyrinth Society
The call of the Labyrinth Society

More information here … Link >


The 2nd annual Big Connection:

Building labyrinth communities for Service to Ourselves and our Planet

The call to Big Connection
The call to Big Connection

More information here … Link >


For many, however, it will also be possible, as usual, to walk a labyrinth.

No matter how, World Labyrinth Day 2022 can be celebrated.

If you are looking for a labyrinth near you, maybe you will find one here:

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The Luan Labyrinth

Andreas recently brought into play the sand drawing “Luan” on Malekula, which Hermann Kern rejected as a labyrinth. It represents an uninterrupted line, but without an entrance or an access to the center.

Figure 1. Figure Luan
Figure 1. Figure “Luan”

But it attracted me to try to make a “real” labyrinth out of it. To do this, there must be a beginning and an end. This is easily done by cutting the unbroken line at one point. And then you bend the end piece towards the center. I took the lowest point of the outer line.

This is how the drawing will look as a labyrinth figure in concentric form:

The 5-circuit Luan Labyrinth
The 5-circuit Luan Labyrinth

The figure may look quite different from the original at first glance, but the lines are identical. The labyrinth has five circuits and four axes with three double barriers and passes through four sectors. The entrance to the labyrinth is on the first circuit, as is the entrance to the center. The path moves in serpentines towards and away from the center. It is a sector labyrinth and is reminiscent of the Roman labyrinths in serpentine form.

From a design point of view, I don’t really like the entrance to the labyrinth on the first circuit. By the way, an entrance to the center from the last circuit is not very happy either. Both are often seen in newly designed labyrinths.
How can this be changed? The easiest way to do this is to choose only two double barriers instead of three, thus obtaining three sectors.

This is how it looks then:

The 5-circuit, 3-axle Luan Labyrinth
The 5-circuit, 3-axle Luan Labyrinth

The entrance to the labyrinth is on the 5th circuit and the entrance to the center is again from the 1st circuit as in the four-axis labyrinth.

Now we want to work a bit more on the reshaping. What would it look like if I arranged only 3 circuits instead of the 5?

The 3-circuit Luan Labyrinth
The 3-circuit Luan Labyrinth

Now this is very reminiscent of labyrinths shown earlier in this blog (see related posts below), especially the 3 circuit Chartres labyrinth.

Very topically to this Denny Dyke offers a necklace with pendant with exactly this labyrinth on his website:

Necklace from Circles in the Sand
Necklace from Circles in the Sand

This shows once again how interesting the subject of labyrinths can be.

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The Labyrinth on the Silver Coins of Knossos, Part 3

There are now digital coin collections in which I have found more coins with labyrinth representations. This is primarily the network of University coin collections in Germany (link below).

In the common portal of the NUMiD group (also link below) I have now found ten coins with the search term: Labyrinth Knossos, of which I would like to show here 5 pieces with the labyrinth of the reverse side.

All of these works and their content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution – Non-Commercial – Distribution Alike 3.0 Germany License.


There are two coins in the coin cabinet of the Würzburg University.

One with the object number ID373 shows the head of Hera on the obverse side, and the 7 circuit labyrinth on the reverse side.

The 7 circuit labyrinth
The 7 circuit labyrinth

The second coin with the object number ID375 shows the head of Apollo on the obverse side, and a male figure sitting on a labyrinth on the reverse side. This has 5 circuits and should be one of the “faulty” silver coins from Knossos.

The faulty labyrinth
The “faulty” labyrinth

I also found two coins at the Erlangen University.

One with the object number ID134 shows the head of Hera on the obverse side, and the labyrinth of the Minotaur on the reverse side.

The 7 circuit labyrinth
The 7 circuit labyrinth

The other with the object number ID135 shows the head of Zeus on the obverse side, and the labyrinth of the Minotaur on the reverse side.

The 7 circuit labyrinth
The 7 circuit labyrinth

Then there is the Münster University with one coin. It has the object number ID1316, and shows on the obverse side Zeus as a bull with Europa sitting on his back. The reverse side shows the labyrinth of the Minotaur, which is unfortunately a bit difficult to recognize.

The 7 circuit labyrinth
The 7 circuit labyrinth

In the digital coin cabinet of the Academic Art Museum of the Bonn University I found another coin from Knossos under the inventory number G.34.07.

It shows the head of Zeus on the front and a square labyrinth on the back.

The 7 circuit labyrinth
The 7 circuit labyrinth

I strongly recommend visiting the digital coin collections: For additional information and to view coins not shown here.

Further Links

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How to sort a Labyrinth Group

Where does a labyrinth belong? And what relatives does it have? How do I actually sort the related labyrinths in a group? What kind of relationships are there? Or: How do I find the related ones in a group?

If I want to know something more, I first take an arbitrary labyrinth and generate the further relatives of a group by counting backwards and completing the numbers of the circuit sequences. It doesn’t matter whether I “catch” the basic labyrinth by chance or any member of the group.

As an example, I’ll take the 11 circuit labyrinth chosen as the second suggestion in my last post. Here it can be seen in a centered version in Knidos style:

11 circuit Classical 7_9 Labyrinth
11 circuit Classical 7_9 Labyrinth

The level sequence is: 0-7-2-5-4-3-6-1-8-11-10-9-12. The entrance to the labyrinth is on the 7th circuit, the entrance to the center is from the 9th circuit. This is the reason to name it 7_9 labyrinth.

By counting backwards (and swapping 0 and 12), I create the transpose labyrinth to it: 0-9-10-11-8-1-6-3-4-5-2-7-12.

11 circuit Classical 9_7 Labyrinth
11 circuit Classical 9_7 Labyrinth

The entrance to the labyrinth is on the 9th circuit, and the entrance to the center is on the 7th circuit.

Now I complete this circuit sequence 9-10-11-8-1-6-3-4-5-2-7 to the number 12 of the center, and get the following level sequence: 0-3-2-1-4-11-6-9-8-7-10-5-12. This results in the corresponding complementary version.

11 circuit Classical 3_5 Labyrinth
11 circuit Classical 3_5 Labyrinth

Now a labyrinth is missing, because there are four different versions for the non-self-dual types.
The easiest way to do this is to count backwards again (so I form the corresponding transpose version) and get from the circuit sequence 0-3-2-1-4-11-6-9-8-7-10-5-12 the circuit sequence: 0-5-10-7-8-9-6-11-4-1-2-3-12.
Alternatively, however, I could have produced the complementary copy by completing the digits of the path sequence of the first example above to 12.

11 circuit Classical 5_3 Labyrinth
11 circuit Classical 5_3 Labyrinth

The entrance to the labyrinth is made on the 5th circuit, and the entrance to the center is made from the 3rd circuit.


Now I have produced many transpose and complementary copies. But which is the basic labyrinth and which the dual? And the “real” transpose and complementary ones?

Sorting is done on the basis of the circuit sequences. The basic labyrinth is the one that starts with the lowest digit: 0-3-2-1-4-11-6-9-8-7-10-5-12, in short: the 3_5 labyrinth, i.e. our third example above.

The next is the transpose, the 5_3 labyrinth, the fourth example above.

This is followed by the dual, the 7_9 maze, which is the first example above.

The fourth is the complementary labyrinth, the 9_7 labyrinth, the second example above.

The order is therefore: B, T, D, C. This is independent of how the labyrinth was formed, whether by counting backwards or by completing the circuit sequences.

To conclude a short excerpt from the work of Yadina Clark, who is in the process of working out basic principles about labyrinth typology:

Groups

Labyrinths related by Base-Dual-Transpose-Complement relationships

Any labyrinth in a group can be chosen as the base starting point to look at these relationships, but the standard arrangement of the group begins with the numerically lowest circuit sequence string in the base position.

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