How to Make an Aligned Wunderkreis

I have already explained the principle some years ago. In the meantime I have gained some knowledge about it, so that I can once again present a proposal for a construction method. This applies to both the drawing and a stakeout on site using simple surveying tools.

I present a prototype based on an axial dimension of one meter. This allows the Wunderkreis to be scaled to any desired scale.

We start with a basic framework with the definition of an axis, on which the input axis is to be placed here. That would be the line E-C. It runs centrally between the midpoints M3 and M4.
After defining the points A, E and B, the center point M3 can be defined by arcs. And from there, the other centers M2, M1 and M4 can be determined.

Note for experienced surveyors:
Right-angled (Cartesian) coordinates can be determined from the horizontal and vertical dimension chains. With appropriate measuring instruments, the most important main points can then also be polar staked out.

However, the radii themselves are best marked out with a line, wire or tape measure and marked with spray paint, sawdust or bark mulch.

Wunderkreis: construction elements
Wunderkreis: construction elements

It makes sense to mark out the upper semicircles (shown here in gray) around the center point M4. Then the four semicircles around the center point M3, as well as the left (5) and right (7) arc pieces (shown in green). The semicircles (drawn in gray) around the centers M1 and M2 form the final part.

Wunderkreis: radii
Wunderkreis: radii

Depending on the design of the boundary lines (according to the width) the Wunderkreis looks like. Shortly after entering the entrance below there is a branch. If one goes to the left, one walks first through the outer circuits. After passing through the inner double spiral, one gets back to the beginning.

We have a so-called walk-through or procession labyrinth before us. There is no strictly defined center.

Ariadne's Thread inside the Wunderkreis
Ariadne’s Thread inside the Wunderkreis

The following drawing once again shows all the necessary construction elements and the corresponding lines for the walls and the path (in red, Ariadne’s thread).

Layout drawing of the Wunderkreis
Layout drawing of the Wunderkreis

Here is the drawing as a PDF file for printing, saving or viewing.

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The Doctopus Labyrinth

Gundula Thormaehlen-Friedman once again was creative. And so this new double octopus labyrinth was created. I derive the name from the core of her idea, the double eight semicircles in the middle of the labyrinth. These also form the seed pattern for Ariadne’s thread (see related articles below).
The free ends of these 16 semicircles can be connected to one another in different ways. So the well-known Classical 7 circuit labyrinth appears, or other variants, such as e.g. the snail shell labyrinth (see also below).

Ariadne's thread in the Doctopus Labyrinth

Ariadne’s thread in the Doctopus Labyrinth

What is so special about this labyrinth? A lot.
For a better explanation, a drawing of the thread follows in a simplified form with some construction elements.

The construction elements

The construction elements

The labyrinth actually spans a sphere. However, it is opened and therefore shows two poles. It is reminiscent of the globe. The vertical axis, like the earth’s axis, is inclined. The thread is intersected on the horizontal axis (equator), but at the same time also linked here. This is the axis crossing in horizontal form.
The beginning and the end are in the middle, not outside and inside as usually.
The access is, as it were, on another level (like a tunnel or a bridge), so it looks two-dimensional (see the post about the outback at the bottom). This also turns it into a walk through labyrinth.
However, if I follow the path sequence, I end up with 0-3-2-1- | -4-7-6-5-8. And that’s the well-known Classical 7 circuit labyrinth.
The thread can also be numbered differently. Then I will get a different path sequence, e.g. two linked labyrinths, a 3 circuit and a 4 circuit labyrinth.

Gundula and her daughter Dara Friedman were able to realize their ideas in a project in Florida. A versatile labyrinth was created there. A relationship and encounter labyrinth was born.

The Doctopus Labyrinth, photo: © Dara Friedman

The Doctopus Labyrinth, photo: © Dara Friedman

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How to Make a 6 Circuit Wedding Labyrinth

I recently featured a 4 circuit wedding labyrinth (see related posts below). I also described the requirements such a labyrinth would have to meet.
Today I would like to introduce a 6 circuit labyrinth. It’s already known as a type. Here it is intended to be used as a two-part and open labyrinth.

In concentric shape

In concentric shape

The labyrinth is entered on the 3rd circuit, the center from the 4th circuit.
As a result, the bridal couple walk side by side on the first and the last part of the way.
The bridal guests can line up outside and inside around the labyrinth. This is a good way to straighten and loosen up the ceremony.

Here the labyrinth in the compact Knidos style.

The 6 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style

The 6 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style

The 6 circuit labyrinth in Knidos styleThe three “empty spaces” in the labyrinth can be used for decorations of all kinds.

Here is a kind of prototype with an axis dimension of 1 m. This makes it easy to scale.

The layout drawing

The layout drawing

Here you can see, print or download the drawing as a PDF file.

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How to Make a Wedding Labyrinth

In itself, each type of labyrinth is suitable for such or a similar event. I’ve seen many different photos or templates for it. That is why I would like to make my contribution today.

Which requirements have to be met? The couple should be able to walk into the center of the labyrinth, both together and individually. There the master of ceremonies or whoever is waiting for them. The groomsmen and the other wedding guests are also waiting there. After the wedding, the couple walks out of the labyrinth together on a new path.

Two-part labyrinths, each with its own path for the newlyweds, are well suited. A larger center and a separate exit are also required.

A mirrored half, open classical labyrinth

A mirrored half, open classical labyrinth

In my opinion, half a classic labyrinth in a circular shape is well suited. Mirrored, thus split in two, and open at the top, so that a walk-through labyrinth occurs. By continuing the 4th round, the entrance to the center happens from below. A 4 circuit labyrinth is created with the path sequence: 3-2-1-4-5.

The more rounded labyrinth

The more rounded labyrinth

The couple goes to the labyrinth together, stands at the entrance and everyone takes their own path. Shortly before entering the center, they meet again and can walk next to each other into the center. The guests are already waiting here. After the ceremony, everyone leaves the labyrinth on the wider path above.

The more circular labyrinth

The more circular labyrinth

With the more precise implementation, there is still plenty of scope for design. The empty, diamond-shaped center piece can e.g. be used for decoration.

The labyrinth can also be heart-shaped, which is often desired.

Simple heart shaped labyrinth

Simple heart shaped labyrinth

The above drawing shows one with straight middle parts, the lower one with rounded middle parts.

More round shaped heart labyrinth

More round shaped heart labyrinth

The heart shape can be emphasized more with a three-part bow. The implementation in nature is somewhat more complicated and complex. The center is also quite large here.

The heart labyrinth with some construction elements

The heart labyrinth with some construction elements

It requires a few midpoints more than a simple labyrinth shape.

Here you can see, print or download the drawing as a PDF file.

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