The Relatives of the Labyrinth Type Gossembrot 51 r

The labyrinth on folio 51 r is Gossembrot’s most important one. It is the earliest preserved example of a five-arm labyrinth at all. It’s course of the pathway using double barriers in all side-arms is unprecedented (see: related posts 1, below). However, it is not self-dual. Therefore, it can be expected that there exist three relatives of it (related posts 4).

I term as relatives of an (original) labyrinth the dual, complementary, and dual-complementary labyrinths of it (related posts 2 and 3). In fig. 1 the patterns of the Gossembrot 51 r-type labyrinth (a, original), the dual (b), the complementary (c), and the dual-complementary (d) of it are presented.

Figure 1. Patterns of the Relatives of Type Gossembrot 51 r

Figure 2 shows the labyrinths corresponding to the patterns in their basic form with the walls delimiting the pathway on concentric layout and in clockwise rotation.

Figure 2. The Relatives of Type Gossembrot 51 r in the Basic Form

These four related labyrinths all look quite similar. To me it seems, the dual (b) and the complementary (c) look somewhat less balanced than the original (a) and the dual-complementary (d). Presently, I am not aware of any existing examples of a relative to the Gossembrot 51 r-type labyrinth.

Related Posts:

  1. Sigmund Gossembrot / 2
  2. The Relatives of the Wayland’s House Type Labyrinth
  3. The Relatives of the Ravenna Type Labyrinth
  4. The Complementary versus the Dual Labyrinth

Variations on the Babylonian Visceral Labyrinths in Knidos Style

By rotating or mirroring one will get dual and complementary labyrinths of existing labyrinths. Or differently expressed: Other, new labyrinths can be thereby be generated.
So I have three more new labyrinths as I can make a complementary one from a new dual labyrinth and I can make a dual one from a new complementary, which are identical. (For more see the Related Posts below).

Seen from this angle I have examined the still introduced 21 Babylonian Visceral Labyrinths in Knidos style and present here the variations most interesting for me. Since not each of the possible dual or complementary examples seems noteworthy.

Many, above all complementary ones, would begin on the first circuit and lead to the center on the last, which is yet undesirable.

Leaving out trivial circuits also will generate new labyrinths. This applies to the last two ones. If you compare the first and the last example you see two remarkable labyrinths: The first with 12 circuits and the last with 8 circuits, but using the same pattern.

Related Posts

The Complementary Labyrinth

If we turn the inside out of a labyrinth, we obtain the dual labyrinth of it. The dual labyrinth has the same pattern as the original labyrinth, however, the pattern is rotated by a half-circle, and the entrance and the center are exchanged. This has already been extensively described on this blog (see related posts, below).

Now, there is another possibility for a relationship between two labyrinths with the same pattern. In this kind of relationship, the pattern is not rotated, but mirrored vertically. Also – other than in the relationship of the duality – the entrance and the center are not exchanged. At this stage, I term this relation between two labyrinths the complementarity in order to distinguish it from the relationship of the duality.

Here I will show what is meant with the example of the most famous labyrinth.

This labyrinth is the „Cretan“, „Classical“, „Archetype“ or how soever called alternating, one-arm labyrinth with 7 circuits and the sequence of circuits 3 2 1 4 7 6 5, that I will term the „basic type“ from now on.

Figure 1.The Original Labyrinth

Figure 1 shows this type in the concentric style.

The images (1 – 6) of the following gallery (figure 2) show how the pattern of the complementary type can be obtained starting from the pattern of the original type.

Image 1 shows the pattern of the basic type in the conventional form. In image 2 this is drawn slightly different. By this, the connection from the outside (marked with an arrow downwards) into the labyrinth and the access to the center (marked with a bullet point) are somewhat enhanced. This in order to show, that when mirroring the pattern, the entrance and the center will not be exchanged. They remain connected with the same circuits of the pattern. In images 3 til 5 the vertical mirroring is shown, divided up in three intermediate steps. Vertical mirroring means mirroring along a horizontal line. Or else, flipping the figure around a horizontal axis – here indicated with a dashed line. One can imagine, a wire model of the pattern (without entrance, center and the grey axial connection lines) being rotated around this axis until the upper edge lies on bottom and, correspondingly, the lower edge on top. In the original labyrinth, the path leads from the entrance to the third circuit (image 3). With this circuit it remains connected during the next steps of the mirroring (shown grey in images 4, 5 and 6). After completion of the mirroring, however, this circuit has become the fifth circuit.The path thus first leads to the fifth circuit (image 6) of the complementary labyrinth. A similar process occurs on the other side of the pattern. In the original labyrinth, the path reaches the center from the fifth circuit. This circuit remains connected with the center, but transforms to the third circuit after mirroring.

Figure 3: The Complementary Labyrinth

In the pattern of the complementary labyrinth we can find a type of labyrinth that has already been described on this blog (see related posts). It is one of the six very interesting (alternating) labyrinths with 1 arm and 7 circuits. That is to say the one with the S-shaped course of the pathway.

So, what is the difference between the dual and the complementary labyrinth?

Let us remember that the basic type is self-dual. The dual of the basic type thus is a basic type again.

The complementary to the basic type is the type with the S-shaped course of the pathway.

By the way: In this case, the dual to the complementary is the same complementary again, as also the complementary of the basic type is self-dual (otherwise it would not be a very interesting labyrinth).

This opens up very interesting perspectives.

Related posts:

The Labyrinth by Al Qazvini

An interesting labyrinth is reproduced in the book of Kern (fig. 200, p. 119)°. A drawing by Arabian geographer Al Qazvini in his cosmography completed in 1276 is meant to show the ground plan of the residence of the ruler of Byzantium, before the large city of Constantinople was built up.

This non-alternating labyrinth has 10 circuits and a unique course of the pathway. I will show this using the Ariadne’s Thread and the pattern. In my post “From the Ariadne’s Thread to the Pattern – Method 2” (see related posts, below), I have already described how the pattern can be obtained. When deriving the pattern I always start with a labyrinth that rotates clockwise and lies with the entrance from below. The labyrinth by Qazvini rotates in clockwise direction, however it lies with the entrance from above. Therefore I rotate the following images of the labyrinth by a semicircle so that the entrance comes to lie from below. So it is possible to follow the course of the pathway with the Ariadne’s Thread and in parallel see how this is represented in the pattern.

Four steps can be distinguished in the course of the pathway.

Phase 1

The path first leads to the 3rd circuit. The entrance is marked with an arrow pointing inwards. In the pattern, axial sections of the path are represented by vertical, circuits by horizontal lines. The way from the outside in is represented from above to below.

Phase 2

In a second step, the path now winds itself inwards in the shape of a serpentine until it reaches the 10th and innermost circuit. Up to this point the course is alternating.

Phase 3

Next follows the section where the pathway leads from the innermost to the outermost circuit whilst it traverses the axis. In order to derive the pattern, the labyrinth is split along the axis and then uncurled on both sides. As the pathway traverses the axis, the piece of it along the axis has to be split in two halves (see related posts below: “The Pattern in Non-alternating Labyrinths”). This is indicated with the dashed lines. These show one and the same piece of the pathway. In the pattern, as all other axial pieces, this is represented vertically, however with lines showing up on both sides of the rectangular form and a course similarly on both sides from bottom to top.

Phase 4

Finally the pathway continues on the outermost circuit in the same direction it had previously taken on the innermost circuit (anti clockwise), then turns to the second circuit, from where it reaches the center (highlighted with a bullet point).

Related Posts:

°Kern, Hermann. Through the Labyrinth – Designs and Meanings over 5000 Years. Munich: Prestel, 2000.