New Two-parted 7 Circuit Labyrinths with Triple Barriers

It seemed obvious to apply the principles for two-parted 5 circuit labyrinths in the previous posts also for 7 circuit labyrinths.

For this purpose, the double barrier is extended to 6 passages, thus creating a triple barrier.

This is what it looks like:

A two-parted 7 circuit concentric labyrinth (entrance 3rd track)

A two-parted 7 circuit concentric labyrinth (entrance 3rd track)

It is noteworthy that both the entry into the labyrinth as well as the entry into the center is possible in and from the same circuit, here from the third circuit.
The path sequence is: 3-6-5-4-7-2-1-2-7-4-5-6-3-8

But it is also possible to design that from the 5th circuit. This creates a new type again.
Here is the example:

A two-parted 7 circuit concentric labyrinth (entrance 5th track)

A two-parted 7 circuit concentric labyrinth (entrance 5th track)

The path sequence is then: 5-4-3-6-7-2-1-2-7-6-3-4-5-8


And here are the two variants in Knidos style:

A two-parted 7 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style (entrance 3rd track)

A two-parted 7 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style (entrance 3rd track)

 

And here from the 5th circuit:

A two-parted 7 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style (entrance 5th track)

A two-parted 7 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style (entrance 5th track)

Now you could move the barrier and its related elements upwards. Then it would not be the first circuit who is completely gone through, but the innermost, the 7th circuit.

So the whole structure (pattern), expressed in the path sequence, would be changed. That would also create a new type of labyrinth again.

Here in a simplified representation:

A two-parted concentric 7 circuit labyrinth (entrance 3rd track)

A two-parted concentric 7 circuit labyrinth (entrance 3rd track)

Here with entrance in the 5th circuit:

A two-parted concentric 7 circuit labyrinth (entrance 5th track)

A two-parted concentric 7 circuit labyrinth (entrance 5th track)

But someone else had this idea. On the Harmony Labyrinths website, Yvonne R. Jacobs has introduced hundreds of new labyrinth designs and copyrighted them.

She calls these types Luna V (Desert Moon Labyrinth) and Luna VI (Summer Moon Labyrinth). On her website you can look at the corresponding drawings and even order finger labyrinths (only in the USA).

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Further Link

New 5 Circuit Labyrinths with Double Barriers

In dealing with the double-barrier technique in recent posts, I found this installation of Mark Wallinger’s Labyrinths on the London Underground:

The labyrinth 233/270 at the station Hyde Park Corner, Photo: credit © Jack Gordon

The labyrinth 233/270 at the station Hyde Park Corner, Photo: credit © Jack Gordon

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

The special feature of this is that two double barriers are located next to each other in the upper part of the central axis. In the routing chosen by him you move at the transition from the 2nd to the 3rd quadrant first away from the center.

I’ve changed that so much that you would “experience” a movement to the center in a walkable labyrinth.

This is what it looks like:

A new labyrinth in concentric style

A new labyrinth in concentric style

I have also moved the side double barriers and this makes the routing in all quadrants also different. So a new type of labyrinth is born.

Here in Knidos style:

A new centered sector labyrinth in Knidos style

A new centered sector labyrinth in Knidos style

Why not as a two-parted labyrinth?

A new two-parted 5 circuit labyrinth

A new two-parted 5 circuit labyrinth

The left part has the path sequence: 3-4-5-2-1 and the right part: 5-4-1-2-3, so there are two 5 circuit labyrinths in it.

And here again in Knidos style:

A new two-parted and centered 5 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style

A new two-parted and centered 5 circuit labyrinth in Knidos style

The remarkable thing about this type is that both the entry into the labyrinth in the 3rd lane takes place, as well as the entry into the center.

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A new Generation of Sector Labyrinths

There are eight possibilities for a one arm 5 circuit labyrinth (see Related Posts below).

The structure of the different labyrinths can be expressed through the path sequence. Here is a list:

  1.  3-2-1-4-5
  2.  5-4-1-2-3
  3.  5-2-3-4-1
  4.  1-4-3-2-5
  5.  3-4-5-2-1
  6.  1-2-5-4-3
  7.  1-2-3-4-5
  8.  5-4-3-2-1

The sector labyrinth presented in my last post (see Related Posts below) has a different path sequence in all 4 quadrants. In other words, there are 4 different labyrinths hidden in it. These were the path sequences in the 1st to the 4th line of the list above.


Today another 5 circuit sector labyrinth modeled with Gossembrot’s double barrier technique:

A new 5 circuit sector labyrinth in concentric style

A new 5 circuit sector labyrinth in concentric style

The path sequence in quadrant I is: 3-4-5-2-1, in quadrant IV: 1-2-5-4-3. These are the aforementioned courses at the 5th and 6th place. The two upper quadrants have: 1-4-3-2-5 and 5-2-3-4-1. These correspond to the upper pathways at the 4th and 3rd places. Not surprising, because the transition in these sector labyrinths takes place either on the 1st or the 5th course.

Here in a representation that we know from the Roman labyrinths:

The new sector labyrinth in square shape

The new sector labyrinth in square shape

Or here in Knidos style:

The new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

The new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

On Wikimedia Commons I found this picture of Mark Wallinger’s unique Labyrinth installation at Northwood Hills station, installed as part of a network-wide art project marking 150 years of the London Underground. It is part of the emboss family (one of the 11 labyrinth design families).

Mark Wallinger Labyrinth 10/270, Photo: credit © Jack Gordon

Mark Wallinger Labyrinth 10/270, Photo: credit © Jack Gordon

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.


Now only two path sequences are missing, then we would have the eight complete.
There is also a new sector labyrinth for this:

Another new sector labyrinth in concentric style

Another new sector labyrinth in concentric style

In the two lower quadrants we have the courses 1-2-3-4-5 and 5-4-3-2-1. These are the above mentioned pathway sequences at the the 7th and 8th places. The upper two sequences (5-2-3-4-1 and 1-4-3-2-5) are again identical to the aforementioned two labyrinths and the one in the previous post.

The quadratic representation shows that it is actually a mixture of serpentine type and meander type (see Related Posts below).

The new sector labyrinth in Roman Style

The new sector labyrinth in Roman Style

Here in Knidos style:

The new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

The new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

Simply put, in only three sector labyrinths can all theoretically possible eight 5 circuit labyrinths be proved.


But it is also possible to move the “upper” pathways down, so that again arise new display options.
Then you can swap the right and left “lower” quadrants.
Or mirror everything and create right-handed labyrinths.

Here are two examples:

Even one more new sector labyrinth in round shape

Even one more new sector labyrinth in round shape

Another new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

Another new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

Related Posts

A new type of Sector Labyrinth inspired by Gossembrot

I was particularly fascinated by the technique of double barriers in Gossembrot’s 7 circuit labyrinths presented in recent posts. This makes possible completely new types of labyrinths. He probably did not “invent” the double barriers, but he was the first to consistently and systematically use them.

How does this technique affect 5 circuit labyrinths?
I tried that and came across a whole new kind of sector labyrinths.
As you know, one sector after another is traversed in these before the center is reached.

The historical Roman labyrinths are divided into three different variants: the meander type, the spiral type and the serpentine type (see the Related Posts below).
The entry into the labyrinth is usually up to the innermost lane. And in all four sectors the structures are the same.
The change to the next sector either always takes place outside or even once inside (or alternately).

Now the new type:

The new sector labyrinth in concentric style

The new sector labyrinth in concentric style

What is so special about that?
Already the entrance: It takes place on the 3rd lane. This does not occur in any historical sector labyrinth. And the entrance into the center is also from the 3rd lane.

Then the structure expressed by the path sequence is different in each quadrant.

Quadrant I:   3-2-1-4-5
Quadrant II:  5-2-3-4-1
Quadrant III: 1-4-3-2-5
Quadrant IV: 5-4-1-2-3

The transitions to the next sector are always alternately.

Nevertheless, the new labyrinth is very balanced and mirror-symmetrical.

Here in a square shape:

The new sector labyrinth in square shape

The new sector labyrinth in square shape

This makes it easier to compare with the previously known Roman labyrinths (see below), which are mostly square.

The difference to these becomes clear especially in the presentation as a diagram. Because this shows the inner structure, the pattern.

The diagram for the new sector labyrinth

The diagram for the new sector labyrinth

Very nice to see are the nested meanders.

But even in Knidos style, this type is doing well:

The new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

The new sector labyrinth in Knidos style

How should one call this type? And who builds one as a walkable labyrinth?

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