Complementary and Self-dual Labyrinths

It is known that there are 8 alternating labyrinths with 1 arm and 5 circuits (see “Considering Meanders and Labyrinths”, related posts, below). Of these, four are not self-dual. These four all are in a relationship to each other via the duality and complementarity (see “The Complementary versus the Dual Labyrinth”, related posts, below). The other four labyrinths are self-dual.

I had already pointed to the relationship between complementary and self-dual labyrinths (see “The Complementary Labyrinth”, related posts, below). Here I want to elaborate on it further. For this purpose I use the same form of diagram I had already used in my previous post (see “The Complementary versus the Dual Labyrinth”). I also use the same numbers of the labyrinths according to the numbering of Arnol’d’s meanders (see “Considering Meanders and Labyrinths”), that underlie them.

Figure 1. Labyrinths 1 and 6

The first of the Arnol’d’s labyrinths, number 1, is self-dual. In the diagram, the dual is situated in the same row, the complementary in the same column with the original labyrinth. The dual of number 1 is again number 1 (what actually is the meaning of selfdual). The complementary of number 1 is number 6. And – of course – is the dual to the complementary again number 6. So in the case of self-dual labyrinths, we only captured two different labyrinths, whereas it were four in the case of not self-dual labyrinths.

Thus, two more labyrinths are still missing. We need another diagram to capture labyrinths number 3 and number 8 (fig. 2).

Figure 2. Labyrinths 3 and 8

And, indeed, these two are complementary to each other. So in self-dual labyrinths, only two different labyrinths are in a relationship to each other.

Here the question arises: Do there also exist self-complementary labyrinths? Up to now we have not yet found such a labyrinth. So let us remember, what self-dual imples. The patterns of the original and self-dual labyrinths are self-covering. In fig. 3 I show what that means. The two patterns in the same row are dual. If we shift them together, we can easily see, what I mean.

Figure 3. Self-dual patterns are self-covering

Thus, self-complementary would imply that the original and complementary pattern would also be self-covering.

Figure 4. Complementary patterns are not self-covering

Fig. 4 shows, that even though there is a certain similarity between these two patterns, they are not self-covering. In my opinion there are no self-complementary labyrinths. This is because vertical mirroring with uninterrupted connections to the entrance and center modifies the sequence of circuits. This, however, woult have to remain unaltered.

Related Posts:

The Complementary versus the Dual Labyrinth

In the last post I have presented the complementary labyrinth. I did this with the example of the basic type labyrinth. This is a self-dual labyrinth. The complementary is different from the dual labyrinth. This can be better shown using non-self-dual labyrinths. I want tho show this here and for this choose an alternating labyrinth with 1 arm and 5 circuits. As already shown in this blog, there exist 8 such labyrinths (see related post below: Considerung Meanders and Labyrinths). Of these, 4 are self-dual (labyrinths 1, 3, 6, and 8) and 4 are not self-dual (labyrinths 2, 4, 5, and 7).

I thus choose one of the non-self-dual labyrinths, nr. 2, and use the pattern of it. With the pattern, two activities can be performed:

  • Rotate

  • Mirror

Figure 1 shows the result of performing these actions with pattern 2.

Figure 1. Rotating and Mirroring of the Pattern

Rotation leads to the pattern of labyrinth 4
Mirroring leads to pattern 7

So we have already three labyrinths. Now it is possible to go even further. Rotating the dual again brings it back to the original labyrinth. However, the dual can also be mirrored. This results then in the complementary of the dual. And similarly, the complementary can be rotated, which results in the dual to the complementary.

Mirroring of the dual (pattern 4) leads to the complementary pattern of labyrinth 5
Rotation of the complementary (pattern 7) leads to the dual of it – which is also pattern 5.

Figure 2. Relationships

Figure 2 shows the labyrinths corresponding to the patterns. The labyrinths are presented in basic form (i.e shown with their walls delimiting the pathway) in the concentric style. All four non-self-dual alternating labyrinths with 1 arm and 5 circuits are in a relation of either dualtiy or complementarity to each other.

Related posts:

The Labyrinth by Al Qazvini

An interesting labyrinth is reproduced in the book of Kern (fig. 200, p. 119)°. A drawing by Arabian geographer Al Qazvini in his cosmography completed in 1276 is meant to show the ground plan of the residence of the ruler of Byzantium, before the large city of Constantinople was built up.

This non-alternating labyrinth has 10 circuits and a unique course of the pathway. I will show this using the Ariadne’s Thread and the pattern. In my post “From the Ariadne’s Thread to the Pattern – Method 2” (see related posts, below), I have already described how the pattern can be obtained. When deriving the pattern I always start with a labyrinth that rotates clockwise and lies with the entrance from below. The labyrinth by Qazvini rotates in clockwise direction, however it lies with the entrance from above. Therefore I rotate the following images of the labyrinth by a semicircle so that the entrance comes to lie from below. So it is possible to follow the course of the pathway with the Ariadne’s Thread and in parallel see how this is represented in the pattern.

Four steps can be distinguished in the course of the pathway.

Phase 1

The path first leads to the 3rd circuit. The entrance is marked with an arrow pointing inwards. In the pattern, axial sections of the path are represented by vertical, circuits by horizontal lines. The way from the outside in is represented from above to below.

Phase 2

In a second step, the path now winds itself inwards in the shape of a serpentine until it reaches the 10th and innermost circuit. Up to this point the course is alternating.

Phase 3

Next follows the section where the pathway leads from the innermost to the outermost circuit whilst it traverses the axis. In order to derive the pattern, the labyrinth is split along the axis and then uncurled on both sides. As the pathway traverses the axis, the piece of it along the axis has to be split in two halves (see related posts below: “The Pattern in Non-alternating Labyrinths”). This is indicated with the dashed lines. These show one and the same piece of the pathway. In the pattern, as all other axial pieces, this is represented vertically, however with lines showing up on both sides of the rectangular form and a course similarly on both sides from bottom to top.

Phase 4

Finally the pathway continues on the outermost circuit in the same direction it had previously taken on the innermost circuit (anti clockwise), then turns to the second circuit, from where it reaches the center (highlighted with a bullet point).

Related Posts:

°Kern, Hermann. Through the Labyrinth – Designs and Meanings over 5000 Years. Munich: Prestel, 2000.

Type or Style / 14

Once more: Type in Style

I have now needed three posts to attribute all labyrinth examples of this series to their types. Here I present the last part.

 


Examples in the Reims style

Reims 1

Reims 1

 

 

 

Type Reims


Reims 2

Reims 2

 

 

 

Type Reims


Reims 3

Reims 3

 

 

 

Type Chartres


Reims 4

Reims 4

 

 

 

Type Sneinton (labyrinth drawn faultily)


Reims 5

Reims 5

 

 

 

Type Saffron Walden (labyrinth drawn faultily)


Exemples in the Knidos Style

Knidos 1

Knidos 1

 

 

 

Type Knossos


Knidos 2

Knidos 2

 

 

Core-labyrinth of the type Rockcliffe Marsh, doublespiral-like mander (Erwin’s type 6 meander)


Knidos 3

Knidos 3

 

 

 

 

Cretan type


Knidos 4

Knidos 4

 

 

 

 

Type Otfrid


Other Examples

Andere 1

Other 1

 

 

 

Type Rockcliffe Marsh


Andere 2

Other 2

 

 

 

 

Cretan Type


Andere 3

Other 3

 

 

 

 

Cretan Type


Andere 4

Other 4

 

 

 

 

Type Al Qazwini


Andere 5

Other 5

 

 

 

Type Cakra Vyuh


Andere 6

Other 6

 

 

 

Type Liger


Andere 7

Other 7

 

 

 

Type Ely


Andere 8

Other 8

 

 

 

Type Kieser


Andere 9

Other 9

 

 

 

 

Type Gent


We can see here a similar result as in the two previous posts. The 18 examples belong to 14 different types.
What can be seen here also is, that in some labyrinths the pattern may be difficult to obtain (type Liger, type Ely, type Kieser, type Gent). I do not explain this further here because this is beyond the space of this post.

The types used

Related posts: