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Posts Tagged ‘Flower of Life’

In my last post I have shown how one-arm labyrinths can be inscribed into the Flower of Life. Now I will also consider labyrinths with muliple arms. I begin with the labyrinth with three arms and three circuits that has already been introduced by Erwin in several previous posts (see also related posts below).

Figure 1: The Labyrinth with three arms and three ciruits

Figure 1: The Labyrinth with three arms and three ciruits

It is possible to inscribe the Ariadne’s Thread of this labyrinth into the original Flower of Life using the same previously described method by following a pathway along the lentiform segments.

Figure 2: The three-arm three-circuit labyrinth in the Flower of Life

Figure 2: The three-arm three-circuit labyrinth in the Flower of Life

However the resulting Ariadne’s Thread is strongly distorted. This is due to the fact that the center is too narrow. The innermost circuit therefore is made up mostly of parallel vertical lines. This makes it difficult to realize that it is a circuit at all.

The solution is to size-up the center so that the innermost circuit comes to lie on the second concentric hexagon. As shown in figure 3 this enables us to give a hexagonal shape also to the innermost circuit. By this, the entire labyrinth is far better recognizable in its intended form, although on a hexagonal layout.

Figure 3: Four circles for three circits with a larger center

Figure 3: Four circles for three circits with a larger center

In order to inscribe multiple-arm labyrinths into the hexagonal grid, a bigger area is needed. This must have a diameter that is one circle greater than the number of circuits of the labyrinth. Let’s examine this with a larger labyrinth. And, given the hexagonal grid, why not inscribe the Ariadne’s Thread of one of my labyrinth designs with six arms. Figure 4 shows my labyrinth KS 3-3 of the category of my Cascading Serpentine labyrinths with six arms and 11 circuits.

Figure 4: Labyrinth of the type KS 3-3 on the hexagonal grid from the Flower of Life

Figure 4: Labyrinth of the type KS 3-3 on the hexagonal grid from the Flower of Life

In order to inscribe the Ariadne’s Thread of this labyrinth into the hexagonal grid, an area with a diameter of 12 circles  is needed (11 circuits + 1 additional circle for sizing-up the center).

The Flower of Live provides a hexagonal grid. This grid can be extended without limits. And it is possible to inscribe labyrinths with a greater number of arms and circuits on larger areas covered with this grid.

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Erwin has demonstrated  that it is possible to inscribe the Ariadne’s Thread of the Knossos-type labyrinth into the Flower of Life. For this, a pathway has to be followed along the lentiform segments in the appropriate manner (figure 1).

Figure 1: Type Knossos

Figure 1: Type Knossos

These lentiform segments form a grid of overlapping hexagons. This grid is generated solely by arranging a number of circles with the same size so that they intersect each other accordingly. The Flower of Live covers an area with a diameter of three such circles. This corresponds with the number of circuits a labyrinth can have to be inscribed into the Flower of Life.

Figure 2: 3 circles = 3 circuits

Figure 2: 3 circles = 3 circuits

Figure 2 shows the reason. Three concentric hexagons can be arranged around the center of the Flower of Life. The circuits of the labyrinth lie on these hexagons. Only the axis remains to be designed in the right way. For this, the closed circuits have to be interrupted and connected with other circuits.

It is therefore also possible to inscribe the other well known labyrinth with three circuits, the Löwenstein 3 – type labyrinth, into the Flower of Life (figure 3).

Figure 3: Type Löwenstein 3

Figure 3: Type Löwenstein 3

Larger labyrinths, however, cannot be inscribed into the Flower of Life in the same way. They need a bigger area covered with the hexagonal grid. For a labyrinth with seven circuits, e.g. the “Cretan”-type Labyrinth, an area with a diameter of seven circles is required, as shown in figure 4. I leave it to the reader to inscribe the Ariadne’s Thread of the labyrinth (beginning at the arrow / end at the bullet point).

Please note:  You may copy and print the figure by a right mouse click to draw Ariadne’s Thread easier. 

Figure 4: Flower of Life for 7 circuits

Figure 4: Flower of Life for 7 circuits

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There are two important lines in a labyrinth:

  • The one is the so-called Thread of Ariadne, the path or way from the entrance into the middle and back again. This is always an uninterrupted line, without branches or overlaps.
  • These are the boundary lines (the walls, the sidelines) which delimitate the way, and between those the way runs. They may cross already once and overlap.

Only one of both lines is mostly shown in a labyrinth. Frequently this are the boundary lines. For a labyrinth that can be walked this is so almost always. Then the way is the free space between these lines.
However, in drawings or images even only the thread or even both can be shown.
This can be sometimes confusing if one has to distinguish a labyrinth from a maze.

The whole labyrinth inside the flower of life

The whole labyrinth inside the flower of life

In my first article (see Related Post below) I had only marked the way (Ariadne’s thread) that is contained within the flower of  life. It is the path of a 3 circuit labyrinth from the type Knossos with the path sequence 3-2-1-4.
The corresponding boundary lines arise if one constructs other lines parallel to the path. These also run between all petals, only the extreme line runs outside, however, touches the outside circle of the flower of life at six spots and thereby forms a hexagon, a honeycomb.
In this labyrinth even the walls form only one single line. They run from one turning point to the other one without crossing each other.
The cube enclosed in the flower of life is even very good to recognize.

The labyrinth unites square and circle. And here still the hexagon as a basic element of life for growth and development.

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Sarirayantra

In a comment I got the reference to a presentation, in which the labyrinth plays a role.

Title: Sarirayantra or “Das Band der Flut”  or “Der Allursatz der Flut”. Author is Mar Cel.

The presentation can be seen on Vimeo (duration 22 minutes).

You may select between a QuickTime a presentation, Apple Keynotes presentation and different printing versions.

The labyrinth is placed into a quite large and cosmic connection. One can see it in such a way, must however not. It will be the best to look yourself.

Annotation: All the text is in German.

The golden ratio

The golden ratio

© Mar Cel (Anangavajra Tamratejas) 2009

For the following terms, which emerge all, a resuming view cannot harm. Therefore a link is specified (mostly to Wikipedia) for all of them.

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