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Posts Tagged ‘crossing axis’

Andreas recently brought here a posting to the Jericho labyrinth St. Gallen which probably shows the historically first crossing of the main axis in a classical labyrinth.

I have written about that already. But now I would like to do it once again. Because for me it seems to be an element to design the labyrinth which I have not seen anywhere.

I became aware of that when I have no longer drawn the labyrinth from a seed pattern, but from the path sequence. And, besides, have noted that there also are different possibilities to connect the lines.

Using the example of the classical 7 circuit labyrinth I will explain this once again. How many possibilities to cross the axis are there, and how does it look like?

First the original labyrinth, however round and with a bigger middle.

The classical 7 circuit labyrinth

The classical 7 circuit Labyrinth

The last path sequence into the middle lies on the vertical main axis. The entrance lies on the left side of the main axis, leads to the third circuit, and turns to the left at first. The entry into the middle takes place from the fifth circuit from the right side, and faces the entrance.


How often can I now traverse the axis?
At two positions: From the first to the fourth circuit, and from the fourth to the seventh circuit. This can happen at each position alone or at both positions together. The result are three variations.

Here the first version:

Crossing the axis from the 1st to the 4th circuit

Crossing the axis from the 1st to the 4th circuit

By crossing the main axis from the first to the fourth circuit I do not change the direction of movement as in the original labyrinth. I am still turning to the left in the fourth circuit.
However, thereby I also reach the middle from the left side, so to speak I have laid this entry on the other side of the main axis.
The main entrance slides a little further to the left, and the two lower turning points also move to the left.


The second version:

Crossing the axis from the fourth to the seventh circuit

Crossing the axis from the fourth to the seventh circuit

Here the change from the first to the fourth circuit remains like in the original, however, from the fourth to the seventh circuit I maintain the “spin”.
The entry into the middle is executed from the left side as it is in the original. However, the main entrance slides to the right side. Both lower turning points are shifted to the right.


The third version:

Crossing the axis from the first to the fourth, and from the fourth to the seventh circuit

Crossing the axis from the first to the fourth, and from the fourth to the seventh circuit

The vertical main axis is crossed twice as in the previous versions, now together.
Through that the  lines are displaced considerably. Everything moves to the left. The main entrance lies again on the left side, the entry into the middle is made from the right side.


Here the path as Ariadne’s thread:

Ariadne's thread in familiar manner

Ariadne’s thread in familiar manner

Ariadne's thread with the axis crossed twice

Ariadne’s thread with the axis crossed twice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe one can dismiss that as unnecessary? It would be nice, nevertheless to try it out in practice. Above all how it feels to experience another change of direction than in the original.

Maybe the opportunity arises in a big sandtable exercise? On a sandy beach for example? Where one can simply scratch the lines into the sand, and allows the flood to erase them out leniently.

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