Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Cakra-vyuh’

In the last post I have presented four variants of the seed pattern of the Cakra Vyuh type labyrinth. Perhaps somebody might be interested, how the matching complete labyrinths look like. Here I will show them.

I thus add three other examples to the only example (Original) of this type of labyrinth that has been well known until now. Or, more exactly, only two of them are really new: the examples in the Classical and in the Concentric styles. I had already published the example in the Man-in-the-Maze style previously on this blog. Furthermore it has to be considered, that the original labyrinth rotates anti-clockwise. I have horizontally mirrored the three other examples. It is still the same labyrinth then, although rotating clockwise. I use to show all my labyrinth examples in clockwise rotation so they are more easily comparable.

Related Posts:

Read Full Post »

A very beautiful labyrinth example (fig. 1) named Cakra-vyuh can be found in Kern’s Book° (fig. 631, p. 294).

Andere 5

Figure 1: Cakra-Vyuh Labyrinth from an Indian Book of Rituals

The figure originates from a contemporary Indian book of rituals. In this, a custom of unknown age, still in practice today, was described, in which the idea of a labyrinth is used to magically facilitate birth-giving. To Kern this is a modified Cretan type labyrinth. I attribute it to a type of it’s own and name it after Kern’s denomination type Cakra-Vyuh (see Related Posts: Type or Style / 14).

The seed pattern is clearly recognizable. One can well figure out that this labyrinth was constructed based on the seed pattern. Despite this, I hesitate to attribute it to the Classical style. For this, the calligraphic looking design deviates too much from the traditional Classical style. The walls delimiting the pathway all lie to a mayor extent, i.e. with about 3/4 of their circumference on a grid of concentric circles. Therefore it has also elements of the concentric style. The labyrinth even somewhat reminds me of the Knidos style with its seamlessly fitting segments of arcs where the walls delimiting the path deviate from the circles and connect to the seed pattern.

Therefore I have not attributed this labyrinth to any one of the known styles, but grouped it to other labyrinths (Type or Style /9). However, I had also drawn this labyrinth type in the Man-in-the-Maze style already (How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 5).

SPCV

Figure 2: Composition of the Seed Pattern

Fig. 2 shows how the seed pattern is made-up. We begin with a central cross. Tho the arms of this cross are then attached half circles (2nd image). Next, four similar half circles are fitted into the remaining spaces in between. Thus the seed pattern includes now 8 half circles (3rd image). Finally, a bullet point is placed into the center of each half circle. We now have a seed pattern with 24 ends, that all lie on a circle.

In the pattern it can be clearly seen, that the labyrinth has an own course of the pathway. Therefore, to me it is a type of it’s own.

Typ Cakra Vyuh

Figure 3: Pattern

Furthermore it is a self-dual, even though, according to Tony Phillips, uninteresting labyrinth (Un- / interesting Labyrinths). This because it is made-up of a very interesting labyrinth with 9 circuits with one additional, trivial circuit on both, the inside and the outside.

Related posts:

 

°Kern, Hermann. Through the Labyrinth – Designs and Meanings over 5000 Years. Munich: Prestel 2000.

Read Full Post »

Heterogeneous Seed Patterns

In all my previous posts on the Man-in-the-Maze labyrinth I have shown labyrinths with homogeneous seed patterns (see: related posts, below). I term seed patterns as homogenous, that are composed of a series of similar elements.

Illustration 1. Single, 2 nested, and 4 nested Turns

Illustration 1. Single, 2 nested, and 4 nested Turns

I have shown seed patterns with single (not nested) turns as well as seed patterns with elements of solely two nested turns or four nested turns. The labyrinths of the Löwenstein 3, Näpfchenstein, and Casale Monferrato types and the smaller of the two labyrinths with 7 circuits shown in part / 3 of this series all have single turns (Ill. 1, left figure). The patterns of these labyrinths are made-up of a serpentine from the outside in. The seed patterns of the Knossos, Cretan and Otfrid type labyrinths are composed solely of elements with two nested turns (ill. 1, central figure), see also part / 4 of this series. The larger of the two labyrinths with 7 circuits shown in part /3 has two elements with four nested turns (ill. 1, right figure).

Most labyrinths, however, have a mixed – I therefore term it: heterogenous – seed pattern. I will show this here with two examples. The first example is the labyrinth, I am wont to use for purposes of demonstrations, so to speak my demonstration labyrinth. It is this the labyrinth that corresponds with Arnol’d’s figure 5, I have already presented in this post.

Illustration 2. Seed Pattern with Single, 2 nested, and 3 nested Turns

Illustration 2. Seed Pattern with Single, 2 nested, and 3 nested Turns

The seed pattern of this labyrinth is composed of several different elements. The right half consists of an element with three nested turns (ill. 2, right figure). The left half is composed of two other elements. One of it is a single turn (ill. 2, left figure), the other has two nested turns (ill. 2, central figure).

How many rings now do we need for such a seed pattern in the MiM auxiliary figure? From the previous posts we know that seed patterns with single turns take one circuit, such with two nested turns take 2 circuits and so forth. Therefore it is reasonable to assume we will need three circuits, as many as are required to cover the three nested turns of the right half of the seed pattern.

Illustration 3. Seed Pattern from Illustration 2 in the MiM-style

Illustration 3. Seed Pattern from Illustration 2 in the MiM-style

And indeed this is true. The single turn on top left of the seed pattern covers the innermost circuit of the auxiliary figure (ill. 3, left figure). The two nested turns on bottom left cover two circuits (ill 3, central figure). The three nested turns of the right half of the seed pattern cover three circuits (ill. 3, right figure). Thus, the number of circuits required is determined by the element with the most nested turns.

In addition there is another effect on the apparence of the seed pattern in the MiM-style .

Illustration 4. Seed Pattern from Ill. 3 with Prolonged Ends

Illustration 4. Seed Pattern from Ill. 3 with Prolonged Ends

In heterogenous seed patterns, not all the ends lie on the same ring of the auxiliary figure. (ill. 4, left figure). Despite this, of course, three circuits of the auxiliary figure are needed for the seed pattern. Therefore it makes sense to prolong the ends on the inner rings so that they all end on the same ring of the auxiliary figure. Some of the dots are prolonged to lines and also some of the lines are prolonged (ill. 4, central figure). The result can be seen in the right figure of ill. 4.

In order to draw my demonstration labyrinth in the MiM-style, we thus need 5 circuits for the labyrinth, 1 circuit for the center, and 3 circuits for the seed pattern.

Illustration 5. Demonstration Labyrinth in the MiM-style

Illustration 5. Demonstration Labyrinth in the MiM-style

The second example offers me the opportunity to draw the attention to a very beautiful historical labyrinth.

Illustration 6. Seed Pattern of the Cakra-vyuh Type Labyrinth

Illustration 6. Seed Pattern of the Cakra-vyuh Type Labyrinth

The illustration shows the seed pattern and its variation to the MiM-style of the Cakra-vyuh labyrinth. This labyrinth has 11 circuits and is self-dual. However, according to the classification by Tony Phillips, it is an uninteresting labyrinth. Of interest for our purpose is, that the seed pattern of this labyrinth is composed of elements with single (not nested) and with two nested turns. Four of its 24 ends, the four dots, lie on the second innermost ring. The other 20 ends, 16 lines and 4 dots, lie on the third inner ring. The four innermost dots are therefore prolonged to lines so that all ends lie on the third inner ring.

Illustration 7. Labyrinth of the Cakra-vyuh Type in the MiM-style

Illustration 7. Labyrinth of the Cakra-vyuh Type in the MiM-style

In order to draw the Cakra-vyuh type labyrinth in the MiM-style, an auxiliary figure with 24 spokes and 15 rings (11 circuits for the labyrinth + 1 for the center + 2 for the seed pattern = 14 circuits), i.e. 15 rings is needed.

Related Posts:

P.S.: Fortunately the seed pattern of the Cakra-vyuh type labyrinth in the MiM-style covers the same number of circuits as the seed pattern of the Otfrid type. So for the drawing we can use the walls (black) of the Otfrid type labyrinth in the MiM-sytle (from part / 4) and only have to exchange the seed patterns (blue).

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: