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Posts Tagged ‘5 circuit Chartres labyrinth’

By halving a 7 circuit labyrinth in labyrinthine logic, as it was successful for the 5 circuit Chartres labyrinth.

The 7 circuit Chartres labyrinth

The 7 circuit Chartres labyrinth

The 4th circuit cuts the labyrinth in two parts. Then I receive an external (circuits 1 – 3) and an internal labyrinth (circuits 5 – 7). Both are identical in its path sequences. Even if the “barriers” are at different places.

Two 3 circuit Chartres labyrinths

Two 3 circuit Chartres labyrinths

The path sequence defines the type: 3-2-1-2-3-2-1-4. It is identical for both versions. This 3-2-1-4 reminds very much of the smallest possible labyrinth: the Knossos labyrinth (and of the meander).
If I leave out the barriers, I receive this labyrinth. This once again shows the quality of the Chartres labyrinth.

To make the layout more appealing, I can arrange the barriers in steady distances, in a way make a labyrinth with three arms.

The 3 circuit Chartres labyrinth (Petit Chartres)

The 3 circuit Chartres labyrinth (Petit Chartres)

This is the smallest possible version of a Chartres labyrinth. And there are just two barriers possible for it. Otherwise it does not work. Also three are not possible, but with four barriers it works aganin.

How should one name this type now? I suggest Petit Chartres because it is a sort of a basic element of the Chartres labyrinth. Still other names are conceivable.

It am speaking here about the type and not about the style. The petals in the middle and the lunations around the perimeter belong to the style.

To create this labyrinth is possible in a variety of ways, not necessarily in the manner described. For more read also the related posts below.

There is even a copyrighted labyrinth of this kind: The Story Path©. Warren Lynn and John Ridder of Paxworks have developed it and call the style “3-circuit-triune”. I do not know how they have found it.

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The Chartres labyrinth occurs in many variations. Here I speak of the 11 circuit Chartres labyrinth as a type. Some elements of the original labyrinth in the Cathedral at Chartres, such as the six petals in the middle and the lunations  around the outermost perimeter, belong to the style Chartres.

For me the type Chartres exists above all in the layout of the paths.  One goes in quickly (on the 5th circuit) and one quickly approaches the middle (6th and 11th circuit). Then follows the wandering through all quadrants. The access of the centre happens from completely outside (1st circuit) quickly about the 6th and 7th circuit into the centre.

Theoretically there are lot of possibilities to build similar types to the Chartres labyrinth. They can be found worldwide. However, the original Chartres labyrinth owns many special qualities which make it an extraordinary example among the Medieval labyrinths. Among others, it is self-dual and symmetrical.

Layout of the 11 circuit Chartres labyrinth

Layout of the 11 circuit Chartres labyrinth

Hence, the original can be divided in labyrinthine mathematics (11:2=5) in two equal labyrinths. I cut it into two parts, by omitting the 6th circuit. Thereby I get two new, yet identical 5 circuit labyrinths in a Chartres-like layout: I quickly reach the middle and finally enter the centre directly from the outermost circuit. The way in between shows the labyrinthine pendular movement, that Hermann Kern describes as characteristic for a labyrinth.

Layout of the 5 circuit Chartres labyrinth (Demi-Chartres)

Layout of the 5 circuit Chartres labyrinth (Demi-Chartres)

How should we now name this type of labyrinth? To me the name 5 circuit Chartres labyrinth seems properly to differentiate it from other 5 circuit Medieval labyrinths with another layout for the paths.
I would like to call it Demi-Chartres.

Just now you may see a nice example for the practical realisation in Vienna on the Schwarzenbergplatz in the temporary plant labyrinth to the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018:

The temporary plant labyrinth on the Schwarzenbergplatz at Vienna © Lisa Rastl

The temporary plant labyrinth on the Schwarzenbergplatz at Vienna © Lisa Rastl

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