Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘3 circuit classical labyrinth’

Almost seven years ago, the flower of life was a topic in this blog. Now I would like to add a few things.
First, the original drawing of Ariadne’s thread in the flower of life. During a visit to Salzburg, Marianne Ewaldt asked me if the labyrinth was included in the flower of life. She gave me a small anniversary publication for the 80th birthday of Dr. Siegfried Hermerding, which was titled “The Flower of Life and the Universe”. It contained countless symbols and prototypes, but not a labyrinth.

Ariadne's Thread in the Flower of Life

Ariadne’s Thread in the Flower of Life

This is the picture to which I drew Ariadne’s thread for the three-circuit labyrinth on 25 June 2012 in Salzburg.

What is it about the flower of life? A sober and rational answer comes from Wikipedia :

An overlapping circles grid is a geometric pattern of repeating, overlapping circles of equal radii in two-dimensional space. Commonly, designs are based on circles centered on triangles (with the simple, two circle form named vesica piscis) or on the square lattice pattern of points.

Patterns of seven overlapping circles appear in historical artefacts from the 7th century BC onwards; they become a frequently used ornament in the Roman Empire period, and survive into medieval artistic traditions both in Islamic art (girih decorations) and in Gothic art. The name “Flower of Life” is given to the overlapping circles pattern in New Age publications.

Many see much more in the flower of life. They may, but one should not overemphasize. From the labyrinthine point of view, it remains to be noted that it is a grid in which, depending on the size, different labyrinths can be accommodated. They always have a hexagonal shape and a cube-shaped appearance. It’s a style similar to the labyrinths in man-in-the-maze style, as Andreas has explained in several articles.

In the articles mentioned below further drawings and derivations of Andreas and me can be found.

To accommodate a 7-circuit labyrinth in the Flower of Life, you have to extend the grid of full circles, as Andreas has stated. Marianne Ewaldt did that as a ceramic artist and gave me as present such a labyrinth last year.

A Golden Ariadne's Thread in th Flower of Life

A Golden Ariadne’s Thread in th Flower of Life

And here is another drawing of me with all the lines of the labyrinth in a slightly larger grid:

The complete 7-circuit classical labyrinth

The complete 7-circuit classical labyrinth

It can be clearly seen that the outer boundary lines form a hexagon and also depict a cube.

Related Posts

Further Link

Read Full Post »

For this kind of labyrinth there is quite an easy basic pattern: Three dashes and two dots. Just as if it were written in our hand. That is what I say to the kindergarten children with whom I explore the labyrinth.

The seed pattern: 3 dashes, 2 dots

The seed pattern: 3 dashes, 2 dots

With it one can draw round or angular labyrinths, but also a square one.

curved

curved

circular

circular

angular

angular

An other nice exercise (not only) for children) is to lay a square labyrinth with matches, paper clips, drinking straws or similar objects similar in size. The center will be three units big, and with a total of 95 components one can make the labyrinth.

A square match labyrinth

A square match labyrinth

The two dots of the seed pattern are replaced by two elements placed horizontally: The left one below, the right one above the vertically arranged three objects.

The seed pattern

The seed pattern

Then we connect the elements with each other, as we already know it from the classical 7 circuit labyrinth. The distance between the lines corresponds to the length of an element.

Children want to trace the way in the labyrinth over and over again, even walk the path. This just succeeds for a width of 20 cm, however, the straws soon will get out of place.

Thus the desire arise to make something more firm. This can best be realized with adhesive tape on the floor. To get the labyrinth really square and rectangular, we need for that a method and a little scheme.

The drawing

The drawing

First we fix a base line. Then the third corner point should be defined. We intersect the diagonal and the side length of the square, outgoing from one end point of the base line. With the same technique the fourth corner point is build. The four sides of the square and both diagonals must have the correct length. So we have produced a figure at right angles.
Then best of all one fixes the end points of the inner lines with the help of the diagonals. After that one connects point for point and will get right-angled lines. The diagonal measurements should better be made by adults, the connection of the points could again be made by the children.

The drawing is designed as a prototype for a unit of 1 m. All specified dimensions are scaleable, so they can be used for labyrinths in different dimensions. For the above shown blue labyrinth all dimensions has been multiplied by the factor 0.21. This proves a path width of nearly 21 cm, an edge length of 1.89 m for the labyrinth, and a total of about 20 m for the lines (adhesive tape).

Here you may see, print, save or copy the PDF file of the drawing

Related Posts

Read Full Post »

The Dutch Maze and Labyrinth Symposium 2011 was in Eibergen, not far away from the labyrinth built in 2003 by the Scottish land artist Jim Buchanan. He used the square labyrinth design known from a Cretan coin, dated 430 – 350 B.C.

Classical square labyrinth with 3 circuits

Classical square labyrinth with 3 circuits

The artwork is at the place of the former castle of Mallem from which only the moat remained. In these historical surroundings Jim Buchanan has created the labyrinth by commission of the Rouffaer-van Heek Foundation as earthwork. The plateau covers 35 x 35 m with three right-angled circuits leading to a small circular tower in the centre. The rotunda is half in the earth, but open to the sky. The earth walls are about 1.50 m high, the pathways length amounts to 270 m.

Jim Buchanan was one of the expert speakers at the symposium. At the end of the first day there was a walk to the labyrinth with a special event. He had transformed the small rotunda into a camera obscura.

Here some impressions from the event:

Picture 1

Picture 1

Picture 2

Picture 2

Picture 3

Picture 3

Picture 4

Picture 4

Picture 5

Picture 5

Picture 6

Picture 6

Picture 7

Picture 7

Picture 8

Picture 8

Picture 9

Picture 9

.
One can perceive the labyrinth very good in Google Earth:

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: