A Labyrinth: From the Coffee Cup to a Meadow

Recently I had the following task: To (let) mow a labyrinth in a meadow. It was a rectangular piece of about 10 m width and 50 m length beside the football ground of a school. Within sight to the Schwanberg. First I wanted to make a circular labyrinth, because I had already some drafts for it. But then my look fell at the labyrinth cup  in the bookshelf with the Schwanberglabyrinth on it.

labyrinth cup

labyrinth cup

If that fitted on a cup, why not also in a rectangle? The center must not always be in the middle (from a circle). And thus I tried on a sheet of paper and soon had my draft. Not mathematically exact as I make this normally, but simply freehand.

draft

draft

The Schwanberglabyrinth is a Roman sector labyrinth (type Avenches) which is circled once. It is made of four meanders which are lined up. The passages can be devoured very smoothly into each other. One has this rhythm in the blood if one has dealt long enough with the labyrinth.

With the sheet of paper in the hand I marched before the lawn mower guided by a gardener of the city of Dettelbach, and thus this labyrinth came about. As a movement figure for the children in the break.

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9 thoughts on “A Labyrinth: From the Coffee Cup to a Meadow

    • Erwin,
      I don’t quite understand, why you want to term this figure a labyrinth. It is made up of several connected meanders and is itself a meander. It is the meander that determines the Avenches type labyrinth, the law of this labyrinth.
      In several previous posts you have elaborated on the subject “from meander to labyrinth”. If you now want to term this figure a “labyrinth by intent”, following the same logic, you must also term all meanders of your previous posts, and even all meanders that constitute labyrinths as “labyrinth by intent”. We would then speak of the genuine labyrinths and in parallel of these as “labyrinths by intent”.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Andreas,
        we have a different sight on the labyrinth. I would like to term this figure as a labyrinth, referring to Jeffs remarks about “Contemporary Labyrinths”.
        If we follow Hermann Kerns strict definition, it is not a labyrinth, because there is no closed form.

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    • Yes, Erwin, in this respect we have different views and justifications, as we may have in some other points. I have no problem with this. We are active in a field where the terminology has not yet been unified or generally accepted.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Andreas,
      very well, we have different opinions: I think it is a labyrinth. Like the Roman labyrinth type Avenches. As there are four meanders, lined up in a row with a beginning and an end. Not the same shape, here I agree.
      This leads to the question: What is a labyrinth? How to define it?
      Answerings welcome.

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      • Erwin,
        yes, this may sometimes occur. Re. definition of a labyrinth I rely on the definition by Kern: closed form, one entrance, one center and so on. To me, your curve is a meander, just as are Arnol’ds’ figures. Such meanders can be incorporated in labyrinths. There is a small but important difference between a meander and the pattern of a labyrinth. On the meander, you can’t truly see, where the circuits and where the axial pathway segments are. This can be seen on the pattern (Ariadne’s Thread in rectangular form).

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  1. I really enjoyed this post Erwin. This is one of my favorite types of labyrinths to make, going with the flow of the land and creating something different than usual. The pictures are vibrant and green! A perfect setting for this Summer Solstice Day! Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

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