How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 6

Non-alternating Labyrinths

In all previous posts of this series with the exception of the second part (see related posts below) I have shown alternating labyrinths. In alternating labyrinths the pathway does not traverse the axis. However, there exist also labyrinths in which the path traverses the axis (in multiple-arm labyrinths: the main axis). These are termed non-alternating. A beautiful example of such a labyrinth is depicted in a manuscript from the 10./11. century of the Stiftsbibliothek St. Gallen. Erwin has already presented it on this blog, and I have published on it in Caerdroia 38 (2008).

Illustration 1. St. Gallen Labyrinth

Illustration 1. St. Gallen Labyrinth

From part / 2 of this series, we know that in principle also non-alternating labyrinths can be drawn in the MiM-style, as the Snail Shell labyrinth is non-alternating. The pathway of this labyrinth traverses the axis twice. Once when it skips from the first to the second circuit and second when skipping from the second inner to the innermost circuit.

Illustration 2. The Ariadne's Thread

Illustration 2. The Ariadne’s Thread

The pathway of the St.Gallen labyrinth (ill. 2), however, comes in clockwise from the outer circuit, turns to the right and moves axially to the innermost circuit, where it turns to the left and continues without changing direction (clockwise). How does this affect the seed pattern and its variation into the MiM-style of this labyrinth?

Illustration 3. Seed Patterns Compared

Illustration 3. Seed Patterns Compared

Ill. 3 shows the seed pattern of my demonstration labyrinth from part / 5 of this series (figures a and b) and compares it with the seed pattern of the St. Gallen labyrinth (figures c and d). The seed pattern of the demonstration labyrinth has one central vertical line. This represents the central axial wall to which are aligned the turns of the pathway (fig. a). This is the case with all alternating labyrinths. Variation of seed patterns of alternating labyrinths into the MiM-style leaves the central line and the innermost ring untouched (fig. b). The auxiliary figures of alternating labyrinths all have two vertical spokes and an intact innermost ring.

This is different with the labyrinth of St. Gallen. The seed pattern of this labyrinth has two equivalent vertical lines (fig. c). Between these lines the pathway continues along the central axis. If we vary this seed pattern into the MiM-style, we find no central wall and the innermost ring interrupted (fig. d). The auxiliary figure of the St. Gallen labyrinth therefore has no vertical spoke.

Illustration 4. Labyrinth of St. Gallen in the MiM-style

Illustration 4. Labyrinth of St. Gallen in the MiM-style

Non-alternating labyrinths can be drawn in the MiM-style in the same way as alternating labyrinths. The seed pattern of the St. Gallen labyrinth has two elements with single and two elements with two nested turns, and in addition the segment of the path that traverses the axis. In the MiM-auxiliary figure this seed pattern covers two circuits. This corresponds with the elements that are made-up of two nested turns. The pathway segment traversing the axis needs no additional circuit, as for this the innermost ring is interrupted to let the path continue through the middle of the seed pattern.

Illustration 5. My Logo in the MiM-style

Illustration 5. My Logo in the MiM-style

And, finally, here is my logo in the MiM-style (ill. 5).

Related posts:

2 thoughts on “How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 6

  1. Pingback: How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 10 | blogmymaze

  2. Pingback: How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 7 | blogmymaze

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