How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 2

The Snail Shell Labyrinth

The labyrinth next to the Cretan is the Snail Shell labyrinth. These two labyrinths have the same seed pattern. And they are the only ones with this seed pattern. Well, how then do we draw a Snail Shell labyrinth in the Man-in-the-Maze (MiM)-style? Very simple: we just use the Cretan labyrinth in the MiM-style from our last post (see related posts below). This labyrinth rotates clockwise.

The Cretan labyrinth in clockwise rotation

The Cretan labyrinth in clockwise rotation

And now let’s rotate the seed pattern, whilst keeping everything else in place.

The Snail Shell labyrinth in clockwise rotation

The Snail Shell labyrinth in clockwise rotation

Rotating it by one step in anticlockwise direction connects the center to the next intermediate space on the same quadrant of the seed pattern. This generates the Snail Shell labyrinth in clockwise rotation.

The Snail Shell labyrinth in anticlockwise rotation

The Snail Shell labyrinth in anticlockwise rotation

If we rotate the seed pattern one step further, the center is connected to the second next intermediate space. This again generates a Snail Shell labyrinth, however in anticlockwise rotation.

The Cretan labyrinth in anticlockwise rotation

The Cretan labyrinth in anticlockwise rotation

And if we rotate the seed pattern one more step further, we will receive the Cretan labyrinth again, but also in anticlockwise rotation.

The MiM-style thus provides an actual layout of a labyrinth which enables us to do exactly the same as we did here on a more theoretical base, i.e., to rotate the seed pattern (a more detailed description of the whole process is provided here). This theoretical analysis was performed using the seed pattern for the Ariadne’s Thread of the Cretan-type labyrinth. It predicted, that by rotating the seed pattern, only two different figures – the Cretan and the Snail Shell labyrinth – could be generated, each of them in clockwise and anticlockwise rotation. With the MiM-style labyrinths we have now an empirical proof of this result. Of course, it does not matter, whether the seed pattern for the walls or for the Ariadne’s Thread is used. Both lead to the same result although represented either by the walls or by the Ariadne’s Thread. In my theoretical analyses I prefer to use the representation with the Ariadne’s Thread as it is easier to read than the representation with the walls.

Related posts:

3 thoughts on “How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 2

  1. Pingback: How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 7 | blogmymaze

  2. Pingback: How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 6 | blogmymaze

  3. Pingback: How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 3 | blogmymaze

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