Seed Pattern – Shifting the Center

In the first post of this series I have stated, that it is of crucial importance to indicate on the seed pattern where the center of the labyrinth is situated. Generally this is not stated and the seed pattern is oriented in such a way that the entrance is from below and the center lies somewhere on top.

The seed pattern for the Ariadne’s Thread of my demonstration labyrinth is also oriented this way. But what happens, if the center is shifted to an other end?

Figure 1: Shifting the Center

Figure 1: Shifting the Center

In our seed pattern there are 12 possibilities to place the center.

Figure 2: The 12 Ends of the Seed Pattern

Figure 2: The 12 Ends of the Seed Pattern

We could complete a new figure around each of these 12 ends as shown in the first post. This will always result in a figure with an entrance, a center and five circuits. This remains the same and thus can be drawn as one general figure. The only thing that changes is how the circuits are connected to each other. And this is affected by the seed pattern.

Figure 3: The General Figure with Entrance, 5 Circuits and Center

Figure 3: The General Figure with Entrance, 5 Circuits and Center

The general figure has a free circular space in place of the axis. The connections for the five circuits as well as the entrance and the centre are distributed in equal distances on the circle. The circle in fact is only an auxiliary line. Into this circular space we then place the seed pattern for the Ariadne’s Thread.

Figure 4: Rotating the Seed Pattern

Figure 4: Rotating the Seed Pattern

This enables us to rotate the seed pattern and subsequently connect each of its 12 ends with the center. The next figure illustrates this process for the connection of the first three ends of the seed pattern with the center.

Figure 5: Connecting the Ends 1 - 3 with the Center

Figure 5: Connecting the Ends 1 – 3 with the Center

We first connect the end 1 with the center. This is the correct center I usually mark with a bullet point. The resulting figure is our demonstration labyrinth. Another figure results, if we place the center at the end 2 of the seed pattern. This figure is made-up of a core-labyrinth of the Knossos-type. To this are added two consecutive circuits outside, without the pathway changing direction from clockwise to anticlockwise. The path thus traverses the axis twice. Connecting the end 3 with the center results in a figure composed of a core-labyrinth of the Tholos type with two additional ciruits outside and one additional circuit inside. Except for the core-labyrinth the path does not change direction and thus traverses the axis three times.

All 12 resulting figures can be viewed here.

With the same seed pattern 12 different figures could be generated. These were labelled as figure 1, 2, etc. till figure 12. The number indicates which end of the seed pattern was connected with the center to generate the figure.

Figures 1 (and its dual, figure 7) and 5 (11) can be considered as true labyrinths, figures 2 (8) and 3 (9) are composed of a core-labyrinth with added circuits on which the path does not change direction. However, these are not spirals in the strict sense as the path does not continually wind itself in but changes stepwise from one circuit to the next whilst traversing the axis. Figures 4 (10) and 6 (12) are combinations of isolated closed forms on certain circuits and a spiral-like or single pathway that only covers the remaining circuits.

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4 thoughts on “Seed Pattern – Shifting the Center

  1. Pingback: How to Draw a Man-in-the-Maze Labyrinth / 2 | blogmymaze

  2. Pingback: Seed Pattern – Shifting the Center / 4 | blogmymaze

  3. Pingback: Seed Pattern – Shifting the Center / 3 | blogmymaze

  4. Pingback: Seed Pattern – Shifting the Center / 2 « blogmymaze

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